Premiere Online Coin Dealer


Nickels

The coin that we Americans know as a nickel has been around since 1866 and is composed of an alloy that is 75 percent copper and 25 percent nickel. Due to a shortage of coinage created by the Civil War from 1861 to 1864 and after experimenting with a paper five cent note, the government decided to mint a Five Cent coin from some type of base metal, thereby replacing the silver Half-Dime that had been in circulation since the 1790s. The first nickels struck were the Shield Nickels that were made from 1866 until 1883, when they were succeeded by the Liberty Nickel, also known as the V-Nickel. The Liberty Nickel was struck until 1913, when only five coins were made, making the 1913 Liberty Nickel one of the rarest and therefore most valuable of all United States coins. The year 1913 saw the first issue of two types of Buffalo Nickels, which were made until 1938. The 1913 Type-1 nickel had the buffalo standing on a mound that also carried the coin’s denomination, “Five Cents”. Because the mound was the high point of the coin, the value wore off very quickly once the coin started to circulate. To fix the problem, the mint eliminated the mound and recessed the area under the buffalo so the coin’s denomination would be protected, thereby creating the Type-2 nickel. In 1938 we saw the introduction of the Jefferson Nickel that has survived with many different variations to this day.

Items 1 to 15 of 32 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3

Grid  List 

Set Ascending Direction

Items 1 to 15 of 32 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3

Grid  List 

Set Ascending Direction

Back to top